Thursday, October 15, 2009

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NC'WALA CEREMONY IN CHIPATA ZAMBIA

  • Thursday, October 15, 2009
  • Samuel Kadyakale
  • Nc'wala Ceremony, Zambia is one of the most colorful festivals celebrated in Zambia. Nc'wala Ceremony, Zambia is mostly celebrated by the Ngoni tribe. The Ngoni people reside in the eastern edge of Zambia which is close to Chipata. The Ngoni people who are the inhabitants of Zambia did not stay there from before. Initially they stayed in South Africa. When they shifted from there, they won many victories over other tribes. The Nc'wala Ceremony, Zambia is held to celebrate the glorious deeds of the tribe. The ceremony starts with the tasting of the first fruit of the year by the chief of the Ngoni tribe.

    This is followed by much singing and dancing. There are speeches that are given by the members of the community. There is also a grand feast laid out for the entire community.


    Nc'wala Ceremony, Zambia is celebrated at the end of February every year. It is a big traditional party. The dancers dance to the rhythmic beats of drums. They engage in repetitive movements with the beat of the drums. It creates a unique atmosphere of music and motion. The people of the tribe are dressed in leopard skins and they carry accessories like clubs, shields and feathers.

    A bull is killed and the chief of the community drinks the blood of the animal and the celebrations start. The members of the Ngoni tribe then rush at the dead animal and tear at the carcass and cut out chunks of the meat.

    Nc'wala Ceremony, Zambia is designed to bring the members of the community close to ach other. It strengthens the bonds among the members of the community.





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    Wednesday, October 14, 2009

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    Some Old Newspaper Cuttings on the Ngoni of Malawi and Zambia

  • Wednesday, October 14, 2009
  • Samuel Kadyakale
  • Below are some newspaper cuttings on the Ngoni of Malawi and Zambia. They specifically mention the Mpezeni Ngoni of Zambia and Maseko Ngoni. They date from the 1890s. I obtained them from the Society of Malawi. Copyright Society of Malawi. All rights reserved.
    From Some of the Earliest Pictures Of The Ngoni
    From Some of the Earliest Pictures Of The Ngoni
    From Some of the Earliest Pictures Of The Ngoni
    From Some of the Earliest Pictures Of The Ngoni
    From Some of the Earliest Pictures Of The Ngoni
    From Drop Box

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    Tuesday, October 13, 2009

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    Appointment of Mswati Gomani as Inkosi yamakosi Gomani V

  • Tuesday, October 13, 2009
  • Samuel Kadyakale


  • This was the Appointment of Mswati Gomani, son of Late Inkosi yaMakosi Gomani IV as Inkosi yamakosi Gomani V. The ceremony took place during the burial ceremony of Inkosi yamakosi Gomani IV at Lizulu, Ntcheu, Malawi. In accordance with Maseko Ngoni customs Mswati is standing on the fresh grave of his father. This symbolises the transfer of power from the dead Inkosi to the new Inkosi. What a colourful ceremony on this tragic day when the Ngoni buried their Ngwenyama yelizwe. May the Good Lord be with our new chief (Umkulumqango makabe naye). Bayethe Nkosi!!
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    Monday, October 12, 2009

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    Ngoni praises for M'mbelwa (Rangeley papers from Society of Malawi)

  • Monday, October 12, 2009
  • Samuel Kadyakale
  • Below are Ngoni language praises for Inkosi yaMakhosi M'mbelwa of Mzimba district in Malawi. As any student of isiZulu would quickly notice, there are here and there some words which appear to be of Tumbuka language origin interspersed in a few sentences. However the very existence of Ngoni language praises, almost a hundred years after the Ngoni left Zululand, is very commendable and incredible indeed. Thanks to the Society of Malawi for preserving this piece of history as collected by Late WHJ Rangeley,a former colonial Administrator in Nyasaland (present day Malawi).


    Bayede Nkosi -Ngu Mbelwa ka Zwangendaba- Uzwangendaba ka Hlachwayo- uHlachwayo ka Magangata- uMagangata ka Magalela- Hamba sihambe siye eswazini - Lapha kwafa abakhulupheleyo - Wake wabona indaba ibebezelwa nomntwana waswebeleni.- Ingane abadala zibakohliwe - Wafika wanyangaya wafulelwa no uchani wezindhlela Bathi umungoni wakithi woima kuhle ulungisa abangoni bamandulo - Umuchiza owumunyama wadhla inkomo zikangani - Wabeke iso njengo nkomo - Hau Hau Zinduna - Makosanyane at gijimani siyokucala zindaba - kepha yena agijima apange Hawini -Uchani wontenteya ungachi - uyakucha ku Injenjeni - Inkosi iphuma kwao Ekwendeni - Ukwenda kumunyuma - Ulugcagca lungasuti kusuti umoya - Ukwenda kupumi Elangeni - Ilanga lika ngcingca - Inkosi ingumachwila - Yachwila zinkomo zakuwo - Kadi zimuka na mabuto aseMtenguleni - Umuzi wakwao kwa Ntuto - Ongu ka Soseya wakwa Ndwadwa - BAYETE NKOSI (copyright Society of Malawi. All rights reserved)

    Compare the above praise recorded probably in the 1940s with the video clip below of a modern day praises to Inkosi yamakosi M'mbelwa in 2008. Apologies for the low volume which makes it difficult to follow the praises. This was due to the microphone not being near enough.

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    Ngoni Pictures - Some Old Ngoni Photos from Society of Malawi

  • Samuel Kadyakale
  • Below are some photos that I have sourced from the Society of Malawi on the Ngoni people during the early period of the British occupation of Malawi. The captioning is from the Society and has largely been kept intact except in a few cases where I have added a few words for clarification. Copyright Society of Malawi, all rights reserved.
    Chikuse, the Angoni King of the Maseko Ngoni in Central Nyasaland(present day Malawi). Mentioned in Montague Keith's 'Far Interior'.
    From Drop Box

    Angoni Warriors at King George V's Coronation celebrations, Zomba, Nyasaland (present day Malawi) 1911.' From the Brown Estate.
    From Some of the Earliest Pictures Of The Ngoni

    Angoni man and child. Copied form a postcard by A.J. Storey
    From Some of the Earliest Pictures Of The Ngoni

    Postcard: 'Angoni Natives.' Reverse reads: 'Issued by African Lakes Corporation, British Central Africa and 45 Renfield Street, Glasgow. Inland 1/2d, Foreign 1d.' Apparently, if this was sent to a foreign address, there could not be any text written on the back, except the address.
    From Some of the Earliest Pictures Of The Ngoni

    C. 1896. Msukasuka, an Angoni Chief, with some of his wives and followers. Angoniland, British Central Africa. Copyright J. Gillespie Watson, Aberdeen
    From Some of the Earliest Pictures Of The Ngoni


    Angoni boys Dance of Death.' Fort Johnston. W.H. Stansfield. WWI
    From Some of the Earliest Pictures Of The Ngoni

    Troop of Angoni Dancers who came to the Coronation festivities of King George V at Zomba, 1911. Descendents of the Zulu who raided Nyasaland 50 years ago.' This photo came from the Brown Estate and was not captioned. Frank M.I. Johston in 1983 bought Arthur H. Walker's album and this same photograph was in it, captioned as above.
    From Some of the Earliest Pictures Of The Ngoni

    Coronation Day, King George V, 1911. Angoni Tribesmen resting after having given a Royal Salute (Zulu Style) in the presence of H.E. the Governor, Sir William Manning, on the Gymkhana Club grounds at Zomba. From the Estate of Henry Brown.
    From Drop Box

    Chief Zlangea, Commander-in-Chief of the Angoni forces. Probably during the war with the British.
    From Drop Box

    Group of Angoni Chiefs
    From Drop Box


    The halt at the frontier Village of Angoni-land
    From Drop Box

    Chief Kafisi, Angoni Tribe
    From Drop Box

    Angoni women
    From Drop Box
    Copyright Society of Malawi, all rights reserved.


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    Thursday, October 1, 2009

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    Some Late WHJ Rangeley Correspondences on Angoni (Courtesy of society of Malawi)

  • Thursday, October 1, 2009
  • Samuel Kadyakale
  • Below are some letters I obtained from the Society of Malawi in Mandala House in Blantyre that should be of interest to those studying Ngoni history and language



    Ntcheu.P.O.
    10th December 1952.

    Dear Rangeley,

    Many thanks for your long and interesting letter. I have questioned an old and intelligent Ngoni named Yakobe, aged perhaps 75 or 80. I did not prompt him in any way but merely asked questions and was impressed by his ready and intelligent replies. I believe he knows the truth of the matter. If Chidiaonga settled at Domwe in 1871 that would be about the time of Yakobe's birth and he would have got his information from his parents or others who had first hand knowledge of the matter.

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